July 14, 2010

How do I keep my pomeranian cool in the hotter months?

I know poms pant a lot anyway but my 8 month old pomeranian is panting excessively now that it's getting hotter outside. She is full-coated and I know it's not good to shave the coat as it ruins it. (I am a groomer, but this is the first long coated dog I've ever owned personally). I was just wondering if she'll be okay or if there is some way to make her cooler in the summer. Any advice is great, Thanks!

I own a pomeranian. It was summer when I purchased him and the previous owners had him shaved for comfort. I was lucky that his hair grew back with undercoat. He still panted a lot even when shaved. Later I read that shaving is unnecessary on poms because their coat serves as insulation from the heat in summer and cold in winter. I have owned him 3 summers now and have since not shaved him. Have you ever seen an Alaskan Husky shaved? I put out a kitty pool in the summer for him and throw his ball in it to attract him to it (only leg deep). He loves to just stand in it to cool off. Another idea I found was to make dogie Popsicles to eat: one small container plain yogurt, l tablespoon of honey or some berries, 2 tablespoons peanut butter and a little water for thinner consistency if needed. Mix in blender and pour into ice cube tray, freeze and give to dog outside on a hot day. It's a great summertime treat. Even my grandson enjoys these when he comes to visit. Also, I always carry a bottle of water with me in the car along with a dish for the dog to drink from. Hope this helps.

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Comments on How do I keep my pomeranian cool in the hotter months? »

July 14, 2010

ladystang @ 5:36 pm

same way you cool off.
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Andrew @ 5:56 pm

Wetting her down is a quick one. Depending on where you live shaving is still the best. I live in the AZ desert and half the year we hit triple digits. Shave both my dogs twice a month.
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-*Sharp eye*--* R.I.P Ricky*< @ 6:24 pm

As temperatures soar, dogs become more vulnerable to heat stress. Maintaining a comfortable environment for your dog is important. Providing plenty of cool, fresh water will help keep your dog cool throughout the summer.

Hot pavement, sticky tar or gravel may cause footpad problems. To remove tar from footpads, rub them with petroleum jelly and then gently wash with mild soap and water and rinse thoroughly. Never use kerosene or turpentine to remove tar. These chemicals irritate the skin and can be toxic to your pet.

Sometimes we worry that our dogs are not eating as well as usual. Unless a dog displays other signs of illness, chances are it's doing what many dogs do during hot weather — eating less. Many cats also tend to eat less during extremely hot weather.

Providing plenty of cool, fresh water will help keep your pet cool throughout the summer. Put a few ice cubes in the water bowl during periods of extreme heat.

Maintaining a comfortable environment for our pets is important. Pets who are left outside should have plenty of shade and cool water.

Confinement in a car or any other poorly ventilated enclosure can be fatal to a pet. One study reports that when the outside temperature is 78¡F, a closed car will reach 90¡F in five minutes, and 110¡F in 25 minutes. Avoid excessive exercise of dogs during hot days or warm, humid nights. The best time to exercise dogs is either early in the morning before sunrise or late in the evening after the sun goes down.

As temperatures soar, pets become more vulnerable to heat stress. Puppies and kittens and geriatric dogs and cats tend to be more susceptible. Others at risk include short-nosed breeds, like the bulldog and the pug, and Persian cats; overweight pets; and pets with cardiac or respiratory disorders.

Adult pets more susceptible to heat stress include those who recently moved from cool to warmer climates, those or with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders or with a history of heat stress.

Dogs who have recently received short haircuts may become sunburn victims and are as susceptible to heat stress as dogs with their natural hair coats. In fact, a dog's hair coat has insulative characteristics to help protect it from heat. Close clipping should be avoided during hot weather.

you can also try to do more activities in water.
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♥Loves her Sealyham♥ @ 6:58 pm

I wouldn't shave. If you shave her too close, she might get sunburned. Plus, believe it or not, the coat actually cools her down a bit by providing an insulation to the heat.

I've used chillybuddies, or these ice-coats, that you soak in ice water, wring out, and put on her back. Some dogs like them, some don't, but they do keep your dog cooler. If she doesn't like a chillybuddy on her back, let her lay on it. It keeps her cooler.
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Ari @ 7:36 pm

some things you can do is maybe buy a small baby pool and fill it up with water and the dog can go in there whenever its hot outside, you can also (this is not a favorite one but it works) shave your dog even just a little bit will help, because i had to do the same thing with mine the hair will grow back. you need to make sure there is plenty of water too! if the dog starts breathing heavily, has a dry mouth, a fast heart rate, seems lethargic or collapses, he may be experiencing heat stroke. Wrap him in cool wet towels and offer him a small drink of water
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Dog Lover @ 8:26 pm

I'm guessing that's your dog in your avatar, she's cute! I bet her having a black coat only makes it worse. :-/ My only suggestion is keeping your walks with her during dawn and dusk and bring water for her when you go on your walks. Make sure she has plenty of water when you're out and she's inside and if you have ac keep that on or make sure there's fans around. Good luck!
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joanplus4dogs @ 9:11 pm

Dogs naturally pant since they can't sweat like ppl so their owners assume dog is too hot when in fact dog is fine & comfortable indoors. Your are 100% right about not clipping coat. For double coated breeds all you need to do is keep well brushed & remove the undercoat. They will shed what they need to plus yours is a puppy & will be losing all the puppy coat to grow in adult coat. Just use common sense - don't leave outdoors for long periods, provide shade & plenty of water. Some of my dogs enjoy lying near a fan, some don't.
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32 yr grooming

LaRita @ 9:23 pm

I own a pomeranian. It was summer when I purchased him and the previous owners had him shaved for comfort. I was lucky that his hair grew back with undercoat. He still panted a lot even when shaved. Later I read that shaving is unnecessary on poms because their coat serves as insulation from the heat in summer and cold in winter. I have owned him 3 summers now and have since not shaved him. Have you ever seen an Alaskan Husky shaved? I put out a kitty pool in the summer for him and throw his ball in it to attract him to it (only leg deep). He loves to just stand in it to cool off. Another idea I found was to make dogie Popsicles to eat: one small container plain yogurt, l tablespoon of honey or some berries, 2 tablespoons peanut butter and a little water for thinner consistency if needed. Mix in blender and pour into ice cube tray, freeze and give to dog outside on a hot day. It's a great summertime treat. Even my grandson enjoys these when he comes to visit. Also, I always carry a bottle of water with me in the car along with a dish for the dog to drink from. Hope this helps.
References :