June 12, 2009

General Pomeranian Medical Information

Pomeranians are adorable little dogs that are purebred and demonstrate high intelligence however, they can sometimes be prone medical issues and that is why it is essential to read and understand about the Pomeranian medical information so that it can benefit you in caring for your Pomeranian. They are typically easy dogs to care for and have a great disposition as they learn quickly and are easy to train. If you already own a Pomeranian, you already know that they are great companions to have so lets look at the medical information that you may require.

Pomeranian Medical Problems

There are several issues to address when understanding medical issues and the first place to start is something simple such as diarrhea. This can be a very easy thing to pinpoint the cause as well as to remedy without a veterinarian because according to recent Pomeranian medical information, this is typically due to stress in the dog, a poor diet and unkempt house and lastly, an underlying illness or factor that is causing this condition.

As a general rule of thumb and as documented in several Pomeranian medical information literature, the Pomeranian is a dog that is not susceptible to acquiring many diseases and therefore its largest issue is usually a problem that affects the knees in toy dogs. Pomeranians are on average extremely healthy little dogs although no dogs are immune to every disease so it is wise and extremely necessary to provide proper care and treatment for you Pomeranian.

Other pertinent information lies around the fact that Pomeranians, as many other dogs, can and do suffer from mites, ticks and fleas. Although these rarely lead to extremely severe medical problems they are very irritating to the dogs and they are not something that you want spreading in your house so it is best to treat this right away. Luckily, the treatment is very simple and in compliance with most Pomeranian medical information literature, it can be easily treated with a reputable flea or tick product from your veterinarian or your local pet store.

As an endnote it is imperative to mention that when sorting out Pomeranian medical information it is wise to be cautious of signs or symptoms in your dog that may require immediate medical attention. You should be very wary if your dog is displaying such things as missing fur, extreme thirst or signs of troubled breathing and should take the dog to the vet immediately for an exam.

Dane Stanton
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/general-pomeranian-medical-information-132948.html

Filed under Pomeranian Dogs by Craig

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Is it safe to own a Pomeranian in two story house?

I'm seriously considering buying a Pomeranian and I live in a two story house. Is it safe for small dogs go up and down stairs?

I'm sure your dog can handle the stairs, as long as you're not making it run up and down all day.

Everyone I know lives in a multistory house, and though the dogs dont normally get to go upstairs and into the bedrooms, their animals are all fine

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June 9, 2009

Caring For Your Pomeranian Puppy

Bringing home a Pomeranian puppy can be a special time as these little balls of fluff can steal your heart in an instant. But caring for a puppy is not all fun and games and there are certain things that need to be done to ensure your puppy grows into a happy healthy dog. If you've adopted your Pomeranian puppy from a reputable breeder much of his initial care will have been done for you and you will probably be given a good set of instructions as how to continue his puppy care. Here is the some of the things of concern when caring for puppies.

Vaccinations

Anyone that's had a dog knows that they need to have vaccinations much like human babies to protect them from diseases. When you get your pupppy from the breeder, he should have already had his first set of vaccinations done by the breeder's Veterinarian. you should record this information and bring it to your veterinarian so that he or she can schedule your puppy for any booster shots.

Worming

The initial warming on your Pomeranian should have been done before you picked him up, but there is probably some follow up that you will need to do. When you take your puppy for his first Vet visit you Victor Neri and will check his stool and we'll let you know what further action needs to be taken. Sometimes puppies need to be wormed again after a few months. Worming is easy, your veterinarian will probably give you a liquid to give to your puppy which will kill the worms.

Dental

Pomeranians can be prone to dental problems, therefore it's important to start good dental hygiene when your Pomeranian is still a puppy. You want to get him used to you brushing his teeth. I find that using a little that has rubber nodules that goes over your finger the best way to brush my Poms teeth. Be sure to use special toothpaste formulated for dogs which actually comes in a flavor that they like. When you start with your Pomeranian puppy, just start gently rubbing the toothbrush in his mouth just a little bit to get him used to it as time goes on he will think nothing of it and you easily be able to continue brushing his teeth when he is an adult.

Grooming

Pomeranians do need to be groomed so it's best to get your Pom puppy used to this as soon as possible. Get them used to the brushing and, in particular the nail clipping. Your Pomeranian should be brushed every day in his nails clipped regularly. You also need to clip the hair that grows out in between the pads on his feet so make sure your puppy gets used to you handling his feet early on.

Feeding

Find out from your breeder what food they were feeding the puppy and be sure to continue feeding in this food as an abrupt change in feed can cause digestive upset for your puppy. If you don't want to feed your Pomeranian this food, you can switch it out gradually. You'll also want to find out what his feeding schedule was and keep to that gradually changing it to match with your schedule. Typically, you should be prepared to feed your puppy three times a day when you first bring him home.

Other Considerations

When you bring your Pomeranian puppy home, the first thing you should do is call your veterinarian and make an appointment so that you can get them started on schedule for booster shots and regularly yearly checkup's. Another thing to consider is whether you want your Pomeranian to be neutered or spayed - if so, this should be done when they are around six months old and you'll need to make arrangements with your vet for this. You might also consider having a microchip implanted in case you're puppy gets lost as this may be the only way that someone can find that he belongs to you.

Lee Dobbins
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/caring-for-your-pomeranian-puppy-89599.html

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How do I get my Pomeranian to play in the yard without me there?

I have a 4 month old Pomeranian and a fenced-in yard. Sometimes when I am cooking dinner and I know she needs to potty, I try to let her into the back yard to take car of business. Unless I go out with her, she will just bark and scratch at the back door. How do I get her to play and potty in the yard without me there?

Have you tried leaving the door open? My puppy is like that, she is so afraid to leave the room by herself. I am sure your dog just loves your company. Maybe give her some of her favorite toys or treats outside and casually walk back in and leave the door open so she knows she is not locked out. She may feel like you are abandoning her with the door shut. Hope I've helped!! :)

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June 8, 2009

Pet Grooming with Diana - #1 Pomeranian

Professional Groomer and owner of Paws & Claws Grooming Salon in North Hampton, NH, Diana shares some of her tips for grooming your pet Pomeranian for touch ups at home between visits to the groomer. Produced, directed, photographed and edited by Soso R. Whaley of Moaning Dog Productions.

Duration : 0:9:54

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Tags: bathing, dog, grooming, health, pet, pomeranian, professional, Soso, Whaley

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June 6, 2009

How do I teach my pomeranian to fetch?

I want my pomeranian to learn how to fetch, so that he will be active, and loose some energy. I know pomeranians aren't drived to fetch, so is there a way to teach them? How did you teach your dog?? He is only 4 months old, but he is smart, and already knows how to sit, stay, laydown, and come!

Thanks
I also want to teach my puppy to leave it, and drop it? Any ideas?

I have a beagle puppy and the way we get him to fetch is that we hold a treat up in the air and the ball in the other. We then throw the ball. After he gets the ball we say Fetch! and hold the treat and try to get him to come back to us. He usually drops it so he can get the treat, but if he doesn't then we say drop it and pull it out of his mouth and give him the treat after we get it.

Here is an article on how to teach your dog to fetch also….

The time has come to have a bit of fun with your pet. You step out the door, unhook the leash and throw a tennis ball to the other end of the yard… And your dog looks up at you like you just lost your mind. What went wrong? Looks like its time to head back to the training ground for Fetch lessons.

Fetch is a simple command and is taught easily to puppies but is not beyond the grasp of older dogs as well. In this simple form of a rudimentary game, fetch is primarily used as an entertainment with a primary purpose of creating bonding time between dog and trainer. In more advanced forms, it is used in police dog training for such things as weapon recovery and drug location. So how do we go about teaching this behavior?

One of the basic methods of training the fetch command is using two toys in a bait and switch routine. The toys must be identical and something the dog enjoys playing with. Starting with the dog on a leash or a halter, hide one of the toys on your person and throw the other a short distance after showing it to your pet. Release the dog from the leash and say "fetch" or whatever cue word you choose. The dog will chase after the toy and, most likely, will pick it up. When the animal starts to return with the first toy, produce the hidden one.
The animal will likely drop the toy they are carrying in favor of the new toy. When this happens, wait for the dog to return to you and be reattached to the leash before throwing the new toy. After throwing the new toy, say "fetch" while releasing the animal to give chase. While your dog is chasing the new toy, run and retrieve the first toy. Repeat this process several times using the fetch command. For dogs that are not toy motivated, try adding a bit of flavoring to the game by way of some meat spread or some food reward when the behavior is carried out properly. Toys such as the Kong toys are great for this as they can be stuffed with all manner of pleasant surprises for your pet.

Another method is the forced retrieve. This is accomplished by throwing the toy a short distance and manually walking the dog to the object and waiting for them to pick it up. Reward them generously for finding and picking up the object. In further stages, have a partner walk the dog out for the pick up and then have them walked back to you with the item. Again reward them generously for making the retrieve.

A few of the common tips given by many pet trainers are quite useful in this area. One of the first is not to go for long distance throwing. Short throws are easier for the animal to keep a visual on and require less concentration. They also make for less work for the trainer should the dog fail to adequately grasp the concept. Another point is to reserve fetch toys for fetch. If you let your dog play with the toy all the time, they lose their novelty and the dogs drive to chase them will be greatly diminished. If you make the dog wait to play with these toys then they are a special treat and the dog will see the toy itself as a reward.
Another tip is to be certain to hold the animal a moment before allowing them to chase the object. This gives them a moment to clearly focus on the objective and to build a stronger desire to retrieve the object they seek. Thus, when they are released, they spring to the object in a flurry of motion and grasp it up easily. Another wonderful tip is to avoid the use of sticks as fetch toys. They are hard on the animal's mouth and may contain parasites or poisonous substances, not to mention confusing the animal if you play near an area with tree growth.

With these simple techniques and tips mastered, you are ready to take to the park with your Frisbee, tennis ball or throwing dummy and enjoy a great afternoon of exercise and bonding with your pet.

Filed under Pomeranian Dogs by Craig

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All The Things You Have To Know About Pomeranian Dog Shelters

What is a Pomeranian dog shelter and what do they have to do with you and your fascination with Pomeranians? Well believe it or not there are unfortunately people out there who don't look after their Pomeranians as well as you would. These dogs usually get picked up by animal cops and taken to a Pomeranian dog shelter.

So what are shelters and who owns them. Most Pomeranian dog shelters are run and by small time Pomeranian breeders who don't like to see these beautiful dogs on the street and therefore they offer them food and shelter. If only there were more people like this and not those owners who offer only maltreatment towards their dogs.

Buying From A Pomeranian Dog Shelter

Most shelters are up to the necks with stranded dogs and struggle to give them all food and bedding, therefore they are always looking for responsible people to come and take a Pomeranian or two off their hands and into a good house where they can live a happy and comfortable life.

If you are thinking about buying a Pomeranian then one of these shelters should be your first port of call. If you are worried about not finding a puppy to bring home to your kids, then don't because there are always puppies looking for a foster family to take care of them. If you decide to adopt from a Pomeranian dog shelter then you will be doing not just yourself a favor but the community as well.

So Where Can You Find A Pomeranian Dog Shelter?

There are many shelters all across the country so you shouldn't have too much trouble trying to find one in your local area. If you live in a small town, you may have to travel a little further to find one.

If you have no idea of where you could possibly find one then you can give your local town hall a call and ask them if they know of any registered Pomeranian breeders in the area. Most of the time they will have the information of all the breeders in the area.

If you are seriously considering adopting from a Pomeranian dog shelter then good for you. You really are making a difference and I promise you won't regret your decision. So get out there and start looking for some shelters in your local area and if you can't find any do what I have said above.

Dane Stanton
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/all-the-things-you-have-to-know-about-pomeranian-dog-shelters-100233.html

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June 4, 2009

Why does my Pomeranian freak out whenever I pick up my Chihuahua?

The Pomeranian will bark and jump at me and the Chihuahua until I put the Chihuahua back down.
The Pomeranian is male and 2 years old and the Chihuahua is female and 6 years old. …..The Pom will bark and jump at us until I put the Chihuahua down the he will sniff her all over.
If it is jealousy and ideas on how to stop the behavior?

he is JEALOUS dogs are often possessive to correct this behavior everytime he jumps at you put him down GENTLY if he do this again do it gain, now if he looks upsets, cuddle him and tell him his a good dog

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Should You Adopt Your Dog From A Pomeranian Rescue Group?

It's a sad thing in this world, but not every dog finds its way into a perfect home and high energy dogs, like Pomeranians, often need rescue from a mismatch. Some families simply aren't home enough to provide a good environment for a high energy, inquisitive dog like a Pomeranian and the dogs get into trouble when left in the house by themselves. Some Pomeranians develop bad habits or are integrated poorly into the household, causing problems for them.

Fortunately for dog lovers everywhere, there are Pomeranian rescue organizations dedicated to taking Pomeranians out of bad homes and putting them into new, good homes. Most good, dedicated Pomeranian breeders are also heavily into Pomeranian rescue organizations and many of them will take great care in trying to rehabilitate problem dogs while giving them a temporary place to stay until new homes are found.

If you're looking at adding a Pomeranian to your household, do look into Pomeranian rescue as an adoption mechanism. You'll be giving a dog in need a second chance at a loving home and you can feel good about keeping an animal from being put to sleep.

There are several reasons to adopt from a rescue agency. You'll generally get the dog at or near full adult growth. You don't have to worry about it growing larger than your household can accommodate. Likewise, a rescue dog's activity level and health should be obvious. Most rescue dogs have gone through a large screening process to make sure any treatable health conditions have been met and anything that can't be treated will be explained before adoption of the dog.

Most rescue dogs are housebroken, either before they got into rescue or after they got into foster care. And most rescue dogs are mature enough that they won't eat shoes, dig holes in the garden or make nuisances of themselves in other ways.

Rescue dogs of any breed can have issues. Sometimes, the family simply doesn't want the responsibility of the dog and sometimes the dog just didn't fit into the family. When you talk to a Pomeranian rescue operation, try to find out what caused the dog to be placed with them for rescue in the first place. This is, in many ways, more important than your first meeting with the dog, who will likely be a little bundle of nerves and anxiety for having been separated from its former owners. Not all rescue dogs have issues and what may be an issue for one home, may not be one for yours - don't let the prospect of the Pomeranian having issues put you off from contacting a Pomeranian rescue organization.

The dog you rescue may be a cherished, loving and grateful member of your family for years to come!

Lee Dobbins
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/should-you-adopt-your-dog-from-a-pomeranian-rescue-group-91947.html

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June 3, 2009

Pomeranian DVD

Pomeranian DVD

Know your Pet!

More on Pomeranian DVD

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