July 23, 2010

How do I make my 3 year old Pomeranian more sociable?

I recently acquired a 3 year old male pomeranian. He does nothing but hide under the bed. I have to coax him out so that I may walk him. Even at meal time, I have to bribe him out from under the bed.
Once he is out from under the bed, he is fine - playful, energetic, and sociable - as long as he can't make it back to his hiding spot.
What can I do to make him come out from under the bed without having to bribe him and then barricade my room?

he will probably get used to you, however postive reinforcement helps.
treat him when he comes out from under the bed and when he stays out, he'll get the point.

also annas answer was good but i disapprove of a choke chain as they have soft throats and many have a hacking problem for no reason at all…

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July 19, 2010

What is going on with my female pomeranian?

We have an 11 yr old pomeranian, for the past two or three weeks the reddish part of her vagina has been hanging out. She constantly licks it like shes cleaning it. Is she possibly going through canine menopause (if there is sucha thing). Should I worry? Should I take her to a vet?

Has the dog ever been spayed??

Best bet - call the vet…if this were your child, you would call her doctor, right?

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July 14, 2010

How do I keep my pomeranian cool in the hotter months?

I know poms pant a lot anyway but my 8 month old pomeranian is panting excessively now that it's getting hotter outside. She is full-coated and I know it's not good to shave the coat as it ruins it. (I am a groomer, but this is the first long coated dog I've ever owned personally). I was just wondering if she'll be okay or if there is some way to make her cooler in the summer. Any advice is great, Thanks!

I own a pomeranian. It was summer when I purchased him and the previous owners had him shaved for comfort. I was lucky that his hair grew back with undercoat. He still panted a lot even when shaved. Later I read that shaving is unnecessary on poms because their coat serves as insulation from the heat in summer and cold in winter. I have owned him 3 summers now and have since not shaved him. Have you ever seen an Alaskan Husky shaved? I put out a kitty pool in the summer for him and throw his ball in it to attract him to it (only leg deep). He loves to just stand in it to cool off. Another idea I found was to make dogie Popsicles to eat: one small container plain yogurt, l tablespoon of honey or some berries, 2 tablespoons peanut butter and a little water for thinner consistency if needed. Mix in blender and pour into ice cube tray, freeze and give to dog outside on a hot day. It's a great summertime treat. Even my grandson enjoys these when he comes to visit. Also, I always carry a bottle of water with me in the car along with a dish for the dog to drink from. Hope this helps.

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July 10, 2010

What kind of problems are there with Pomeranian dogs?

I want to get a Pomeranian dog but i need to know what kind of things i need to look for when buying one.

Pomeranians have lots of individual character. They're prone to jealousy (family members), so unless it's very well trained, I wouldn't recommend them around little kids.

I don't know about the majority of poms, but mine was easy to house train. Like everyone said, shaving around the butt would be good, though they tend to be self-cleaning dogs, poo tends to get stuck… ick!

A bit yappy and vocal. Tons of personality that comes with tons of bark and sometimes bite. I'm sure if we trained ours, she would bark/bite less. Plus, when you choose your puppy out of a litter, go for the quiet ones if you don't like barking. Mine was the loudest one out of the bunch, which would explain her uh vocal behavior.

On the outside, cute looking. Poms adapt well to owners schedules, as do some other little dogs. I.e., they know when it's a weekday and when it's a weekend.

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July 5, 2010

Is a pomeranian terrier mix a good dog for someone allergic to dogs?

I know there are some dogs that even allergic people can have around (like poodles for instance). I'm wondering if a pomeranian terrier would fall into that category.

Not at all, Pomeranians shed, terriers shed, some more than others, and there are no guarantees with a mix.

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July 1, 2010

What is Weaning puppies and when will pomeranian puppies open their eyes?

I've been reading about the weaning process but it doesn't tell me what it is. My pups will be 1 week old on tuesday.

Also, When will Pomeranian puppies open their eyes?

why are you raising puppies if you cant answer these questions?!?!
to begin with they pups should start openeing their eyes at 2 weeks..they will just start peaking out at first in the corners so please..please do not try and force the eyes all the way open. and to begin weaning i would start offering the puppies soaked until soft puppy food..and its ok to let mom eat the left over puppy food..this is actually good for her. starting at 4-5 weeks start limiting the time mom is with the pups and feeding them puppy food more often until mom is completly out of the picture…i do with the best to the puppies…maybe next time you should study up alittle befor the pups arrive
and also..should de-worm the pups at 3 weeks..and again in 10 days to kill all eggs that have hatched. should begin puppy shots at 6 weeks

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June 28, 2010

Getting To Know The Long Haired Chihuahua

Getting to know your dog starts by getting to know its breed, and that includes getting a better idea about its appearance, personality, and health requirements. Here's what you need to know about the long haired Chihuahua:

Known as the smallest of all breeds, the Chihuahua is a popular breed, partially due to commercials and celebrity ownership. Originating from Mexico, this breed is also known for its longevity, living upward to 18 years or more. Interestingly, the Chihuahua dates back to Aztec royalty but over time, it was taken into Mexico by the Spanish settlers and then on into the United States. Although this history is what the majority believe, a small number of historians favor the story of the Chihuahua coming out of Egypt, then making their way into Spain, followed by Mexico.

Today, you will hear terms such as "teacup" and tiny toy," which are not actually hybrids of the Chihuahua but definitions of size. Therefore, if you were to visit a breeder to find the dogs advertised as "teacup breeds," you would know there is no such thing. In addition, terms such as "deer face" or "deer head" are used to describe the apple shape of the head. The Chihuahua is small but generally a healthy breed although there are some special things to consider.

Physical Appearance

For the long haired Chihuahua, there is a smooth undercoat with a long overcoat. Some people mistake this particular breed of Chihuahua with that of a Pomeranian. Keep in mind that both the longhair and short hair versions of the Chihuahua are recognized by the American Kennel Club. In addition, the Chihuahua has an apple or dome-shaped head, with large eyes and erect ears.

Because height is so varied, this recognition usually includes only weight with overall body proportions being considered. For instance, a Chihuahua could be anywhere from 12 to 15 inches tall. However, dogs used for show would only weight six pounds or less although they can go down to around four pounds. Dogs not used for show could be much heavier, going up to 10 pounds.

Just as the height and weight vary so does color and color combinations. The following are examples of the different options for the Chihuahua:

* Solid White
* Solid Black
* Fawn (cream to light brown)
* Chocolate (light brown to rich mahogany)
* Blue Gray
* Tri-color (chocolate and blue or black, with tan and white markings)
* Silver
* Merle
* Brindle

Temperament and Personality

Without doubt, the Chihuahua is one of the most loving and devoted of all breeds. This breed is very smart, alert, and often comical. The small size of the Chihuahua means it does not require much exercise although it is a playful breed. Because of this size, you find the breed a perfect choice for the elderly, the disabled, people living in apartments or high-rises, those with small yards, and so on. Unfortunately, this breed also has the reputation of being high-strung and difficult to train but with good socialization and training, the Chihuahua makes an excellent pet.

A Chihuahua is typically better with adults although they will tolerate older children without much trouble. Just keep in mind that because of the small size, the potential of injury when handled by a small child could be significant. Therefore, most breeders do not recommend the breed for households where small children live.

Health

Because of the small stature, the Chihuahua is very sensitive to cold weather. For this reason, you will often see this breed in coats and sweaters during the wintertime, and even sometimes in the summer, to keep body temperature comfortable. Other important things to consider when buying a Chihuahua is the need for good dental care, and pregnancy and birthing can be difficult.

In addition, this breed will on occasion suffer from neurological issues specific to seizures and epilepsy. A Patella Luxation is another concern, a problem that develops with the kneecap. A collapsed trachea is somewhat common, causing a coughing and almost choking sound. If treated with surgery early on, the problem can be corrected without too much difficulty and in some cases, various types of medication can be used to help with the symptoms.

This breed is born with an incomplete skull. In other words, unlike other dog breeds, the Chihuahua has a soft spot in the skull called the Moleras. Although this area will grow together as the dog ages, special care needs to be given during the initial six months. Eye infections are another possible health concern because of the large round shape. However, proper cleaning and being aware of the risk are usually the best forms of prevention.

Finally, the Chihuahua falling within the Merle color family tends to have far more health problems than other colors. Somehow, genetics play a role, creating a variety of health problems to include deafness, blindness, sterility, hemophilia, among other things. Therefore, when buying a Chihuahua, this information should be considered.

Dan Stevens
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/getting-to-know-the-long-haired-chihuahua-84324.html

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June 27, 2010

How do you stud out a male pomeranian?

I have a male pomeranian that has been checked for all the defects, is papered, and is twice proven.
How do i go about studing him out? How do i find out what the normal cost is to do such a thing?

Start showing him in conformation trials with a reputable kennel club - if he's good, the b!tches will be lined up waiting.

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June 23, 2010

Toy Dog Breeds: Man's Best Friend

Dogs are indeed cute and cuddly. They also serve as man's best friends. Nowadays, different dogs are making a scene everywhere. It is even a form of fashion for some celebrities.

A toy dog is actually a petite dog which is quite small when compared to working dogs. It is safe to determine toy dogs by their size although it is quite confusing since there is still no guaranteed facts which state that height and weight is considered in classifying a dog as a toy.

Some of the toy breeds are Pomeranian, Pug, Shih Tzu, Poodle, Papillion and the likes. These toy dogs are beautiful and charming and they also represent an important role in people's lives. Although they are small, they also have the capability to hunt and eliminate pest animals.

Some of these toy dogs also serve as man's guardians. They also bark at people whom they are not familiar with. They can be as tough as the other large dogs.

The most fascinating thing about toys dogs is their affective capability wherein they can fill the needs of sad and lonely individuals and the adults. They are also known for helping those that are in depressed state of mind through manifesting care and of course happiness. They also have impetuous instincts which help in providing all the friendship and as well as affection, and in turn gives new meaning to people's lives.

A legend states that when a noble Aztec was about to die, a Chihuahua is used as a sacrifice to transmigrate the sins of the noble man to the sacrificed dog, which in turn avoids the noble man from divine punishment. The Chinese religion, which is Buddhism, has a lion symbol meaning a sacred nation. They used the Pekinese dog to represent as lions because they have no lions back then and the Pekinese dogs have the closest resemblance to it.

There are lots of breeders of the toy dogs who keep their cute puppies for about ten to twelve weeks old rather selling or distributing them at about eight to nine weeks. They also consider the family before selling it. More often than not, they will not sell it to family with too many kids and even to those who has hyper active child.

Generally, toy dogs are very easy to take care of. There are some who needs heavy grooming such as the Shih-Tzu, Terrier and Pomeranian. The Toy Poodle, Japanese Chin and Toy Spaniel on the other hand require only a moderate grooming. While other toy dogs do not require any grooming at all.

The basic and most important thing to remember is to maintain the long and fine hairs free from tangles to prevent pain and other skin problems that your dog may acquire. You don't want to shell out big bucks of money for veterinary cost in the end, don't you?

The production of toy dogs is by mass production when compared to larger breeds. Some distributors can just put their little Chihuahuas on a shopping cart or chicken cage and they are easy to deliver when compared to the larger ones like the German shepherd. The downside of buying toy dogs in a pet shop is that most often than not they are quite difficult to house train.

There are some toy dog breeds that are crossbred to other breeds to produce a -poo dog breed. So for those consumers who want to buy a purebred toy dogs, beware of such -poo breeds. They look like the other toy dogs but then they differ in attitude sometimes. Some of these -poo dogs are ill-tempered, hyper and yappy.

Is it possible to train the toy dogs with regards to their attitude? Absolutely, yes! The best way to teach your toy dogs with manners is through obedience commands. You should teach your dog on how to obey such as for example, if he is about to do something bad or any inappropriate act, you should reprimand him with a firm NO!

By doing so, you're practicing the dog to acquaint himself from knowing what is okay to do from not. Your "no" should always catch his attention. But then remember also to acknowledge the good things that your toy dog will do. A simple saying of "good boy" with a piece of his favorite snack will do the trick.

Lee Dobbins
http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/toy-dog-breeds-mans-best-friend-79861.html

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June 22, 2010

How much should a 4 month Pomeranian weigh?

My male Pomeranian will be 4 months on the 30th. He weighs 9 pounds already. My parents have a Pomeranian and it weighs that much full grown. And he's already taller than my parents Pom. And he IS a purebreed Pom. Do I have a monster Pomeranian on my hands?
Yes, he is a full-blood, pure breed Pom.
And he's not fat.. He's tall and lean.

What do his parents weigh?

A Pomeranian should ideally weight 3-7 pounds at adulthood. At 4 months, a Pomeranian should not be 9 pounds. I would place a call to the breeder that you bought from and see if this is normal for their litters to be extremely large, then I would seriously consider never buying from them again.

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